Terça-feira, 12 de Maio de 2020

5 Signs of Intellectual Dishonesty and How to Beat It

5 Signs of Intellectual Dishonesty and How to Beat It

Lottie Miles, M.A.

learning-mind.com

Posted May 12th, 2020.

 
intellectual dishonesty signs.

 


Have you ever ignored or avoided a tough question? Do you find it hard to admit to making errors? Or perhaps you are dismissive of the arguments of others and employ double standards to how you interpret things. If any of these ring a little bit true, then you are likely demonstrating intellectual dishonesty.
In this post, we will look at what intellectual dishonesty is, why it is important, how to recognize it, and the steps you need to take to beat it.

What Is Intellectual Dishonesty?

A good starting point is to explore how intellectual dishonesty differs from regular dishonesty. When someone is being simply dishonest, they are often misrepresenting a clear fact e.g. ‘no, I did not take that last cookie!’ If that is the case, they may need to focus on how to stop lying.
Intellectual dishonesty is not applying the same intellectual rigor or weighting to your own beliefs as you do to the beliefs of others. It may not be as simple as someone lying; someone may just ignore holes in their own thinking or logic, as it doesn’t fit with their intended outcome.
Intellectual dishonesty also often relates to being closed-minded and not being open to others’ points of view. People react by being intellectually dishonest to make the facts suit their opinion. Avoiding other opinions or new information makes it much easier to reach your intended conclusion.

Intellectual Honesty

Before exploring more about intellectual dishonesty, it is important to briefly mention its counterpart: intellectual honesty. This is what we are trying to achieve by challenging dishonesty. To reach it, someone needs to be open to all viewpoints and be willing to change their mind.
If someone is genuinely intellectually honest, they are willing to change their opinion, even if it may not suit their goals. They care more about having high standards of truth than being ‘right’. They will be unbiased in their selection of sources to support their argument and they will adequately reference any sources they use.

Why Is Intellectual Honesty Important?

In a world full of misinformation and fake news, challenging intellectual dishonesty is of growing importance. On key issues such as the environment, education, and health, there is growing confusion around facts. If public opinion is based on incorrect or unchallenged facts, the policies governments make may also be compromised.
We need to ensure we can stop the spread of potentially dangerous mistruths and untruths. How can we do that? By learning how to spot and stop intellectual dishonesty, we are better equipped to fight the problem.

Intellectual Dishonesty in Science and Medicine

One specific example where intellectual dishonesty can have potentially damaging consequences for society is when it is applied to academics. This is particularly the case in science and medicine. This is shown particularly well in a study into intellectual dishonesty in science [1].
The majority of scientists that make mistakes do so by accident. However, there is a tendency among some scientists to make mistakes intentionally. Through “cooking” or “trimming” results, they tailor their results to show what they want rather than what the data actually shows.
If this is done in medical studies or with pharmaceutical trials, the potential for dangerous outcomes is worrying. Indeed, another study [2] highlighted the need to give medical researchers extra training about the potentially damaging outcomes of intellectual dishonesty in research.

How Do You Beat Intellectual Dishonesty?

There is no sure-fire way to beat intellectual dishonesty. Some people simply refuse to believe something other than their own truth. However, here is a 6 step guide that should help you in your worthwhile quest. It is designed for engaging in a conversation with someone. However, it applies to other scenarios, such as a debate.

Step 1: Spot the signs

The first thing to consider when trying to beat it is to understand the signs that it is being used. Here are five common signs or techniques of someone being intellectually dishonest:
  1. Ignoring or avoiding the question.
  2. Employing double standards.
  3. Never admitting error or pretending things make sense when they don’t.
  4. Being vague in their answers, often to deceive others.
  5. Being dismissive of others’ arguments without giving a proper reason.

Step 2: Be intellectually honest

Once you have spotted the signs, the next step is to be sure of your own intellectual honesty. As the old saying goes, ‘two wrongs don’t make a right’. Also, if the other person spots you being intellectually dishonest, they will be less likely to change.

Step 3: Listen to the other person

Truly listen to the arguments of others and take them in, rather than simply waiting to make your point. By doing so, you may not only have a better interaction with that person, you may be in a better position to call them out on their intellectual dishonesty if you so wish. There are different types of listening you can employ to do this.

Step 4: Question

This is your opportunity to carefully question some of the dishonest claims of the other. This may be difficult as some people may react negatively. They may be affronted and close down the conversation or fight back. To try and prevent this, ask questions in a non-confrontational manner.

Step 5: Re-question

If the other person is dodging your questions, ask them again. You can try and ask the same question a different way to give the other person a chance. However, if they persist in dodging, repeat the question the exact same way.

Step 6: Call them out

If the other person is repeatedly displaying signs of intellectual dishonesty, call them out on it. If other reasonable strategies have failed, it may be best to highlight what they are doing.

Step 7: Rewind

If you feel the discussion is going off track, go back to the start. Listen again and try and comprehend in better detail what their arguments are. Then repeat the other steps to break through their intellectual dishonesty.
Are you prone to being intellectually dishonest or do you know someone who is? Feel free to share your thoughts on the topic in the comment box below.
References:
  1. https://www.researchgate.net
  2. https://www.researchgate.net


 

 

Lottie Miles

 




 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2020 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



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No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


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Discernment is recommended.
 
 

 

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publicado por achama às 18:12
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Sexta-feira, 8 de Maio de 2020

What Is Practical Wisdom, Why You Need It and How to Develop It

What Is Practical Wisdom, Why You Need It and How to Develop It

Lottie Miles, M.A.

learning-mind.com

Posted May 8th, 2020.

 
practical wisdom.

 


Many of us sometimes feel a bit lost. We can be paralyzed by decisions and end up feeling emotionally numb. Do you ever feel like you need to reconnect with some inner compass? The answer could be found in developing practical wisdom.
But what exactly is practical wisdom? In this post, we will explore its history. From all the way back to Aristotle to how it is thought of today. After uncovering the virtues of practical wisdom, you will discover why you need it and how to develop it.
Aristotle and Practical Wisdom
Much of our knowledge and thinking around practical wisdom goes back to Aristotle. Interestingly, Aristotle’s thinking went against his teacher Plato. Plato thought that wisdom was not practical but only attainable in the realm of theory and abstract thought.
In Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle outlines how practical wisdom is a moral or intellectual basis for our actions. While similar to the skills of a craftsman (to build a table) or a pianist (to play the piano), practical wisdom is a moral skill, rather than an artistic or technical one. We know what to do and the reasons behind our decisions.
Life, for Aristotle, is a constant stream of choices. It can be when choosing to be loyal to a friend, or how to be just, or how to cope with risk, or when and how to be angry—and making the right choices demanded by wisdom. Practical wisdom formed a significant part of his thinking on ethics. Moreover, it is still hugely influential on our thinking today.

Why Do You Need Practical Wisdom?

Today, much of our society is in desperate need of practical wisdom. Societies are increasingly complex and bureaucratic. Rather than focusing on what we can do ourselves, we tend to follow rules and go through life unequipped. However, as Aristotle suggested, we need wisdom when making choices. Should I take that job? Am I with the right person? Etc.
In the real world, nobody can tell you how to live your personal life. You can follow societal rules or laws set by governments, but these are not the best guides. When it comes down to it, you have to decide. As the decisions you make can have such profound consequences on your happiness and wellbeing, developing the guiding compass of practical wisdom is a must.
The wisdom to answer questions such as these and to live the right way is a practical process, not a theoretical one. It is reliant on our capacity to perceive a situation and to consider what the appropriate response is. We need to know when to act, when to feel, when to desire, and in what ways.
It is not a selfish pursuit. Developing this type of wisdom can be very beneficial to friends and family around you. You’re likely to be a more understanding person, who makes wiser decisions, and is generally nice to be around.
If you struggle with making decisions and are unsure of the ‘right choice’, developing practical wisdom can give you some guidance. It can also help you tap into an inner understanding, often referred to as intuition.

Intuition

Intuition is nonconscious thinking. Essentially, the brain on autopilot. Viewed by some as being a mysterious process, intuition and its relationship with practical wisdom are gaining increased interest. Our ‘intuitions’ are innate opinions. Whilst some are common-sense, some are sophisticated. Others are particular, general, more firmly held, or some less.
In his study, Robin Hogarth explores the basis for intuition in psychology. It is a normal and important component of thought that has its roots in the processes of tacit learning. It incorporates an appreciation of environment, attention, experience, and expertise. Understanding our intuition is a step on the way to being able to develop practical wisdom.
How to Develop Practical Wisdom?
In their exploration into the topic, Barry Schwartz and Kenneth Sharpe look at the history of practical wisdom and it’s application today. They offer 6 rules to follow to develop practical wisdom:
  1. Fully understand the proper goals of the activity you are engaged in.

    To help yourself or others, it is important to do the right thing to reach these goals.
  2. Improvize.

    To be able to adapt to a given situation and be aware of a changing environment in which strategies may need to change.
  3. Be perceptive, especially of the attitudes of others.

    Remember that social norms may change from context to context. You also need to be aware of these changes to change your behavior.
  4. Build up experience.

    Practical wisdom is something that can be learned and developed. Like all skills, practice and repetition are key to its development. In your daily life, listen to others, be caring, and be loyal. Behave with honesty and a sense of justice.
  5. Be empathetic and understand others’ perspectives.

    Everyone thinks differently and this affects how we behave. Putting yourself in the shoes of another person allows you to understand why they may be acting in a certain way.
  6. Combine reason and emotion.

    This will allow you to understand what others’ emotional signals mean and respond in a reasoned way. It is an educated emotional response to situations.
By undertaking these steps you can start on your journey to develop practical wisdom. Live life every day with consciousness and awareness of what is going around you. The key is experience.
Always try to experience life with your eyes open. Life itself is to be practiced and, with practical wisdom, you can do so in an enriching and thoughtful way.


 

 

Lottie Miles

 




 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2020 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 
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Alternatives to YouTube
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brighteon.com
 


 
All articles are of the respective authors or publishers responsibility. 
 


 
No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 
 

 

Like this! please bookmark. It is updated daily

 


 
 
 
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publicado por achama às 20:56
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Segunda-feira, 4 de Maio de 2020

Tree-Hugging Encouraged in Iceland as a Way to Cope with Isolation

Tree-Hugging Encouraged in Iceland as a Way to Cope with Isolation

Lottie Miles, M.A.

learning-mind.com

Posted May 4th, 2020.

 
.Tree Hugging

 


The citizens of Iceland have been encouraged by the forestry service to hug trees every day for five at least minutes. This is being encouraged to help people cope with social isolation, but does it really work? In this post, we will look at research showing the surprising benefits of hugging trees and explore why tree-hugging really can make you feel better.

Why is tree-hugging recommended in Iceland?

In response to the challenges of social isolation and social distancing due to COVID-19, Iceland’s Forestry Service has encouraged tree-hugging. Physical contact with others has been discouraged whether we are socially distancing or socially isolating. However, this prolonged physical separation can be psychologically challenging. The lack of hugs and physical touch can intensify feelings of separation, isolation, and loneliness. Iceland’s response? Hug trees!
Icelanders are being recommended to hug a tree for at least 5 minutes. The experience of hugging a tree has been described as a visceral feeling. As you hug the tree, a sensation travels through your toes and up through your body all the way up to your head. Rangers from the Hallormsstaður National Forest have cleared snow and marked out 2-meter spaces to help.

The psychological benefits of connection to nature

Humans are intimately connected to nature. This is an idea that has persisted across cultures and throughout the history of time. This is reflected by the idea that we all tend to prefer countryside views to urban ones. Similarly, 100s of studies have found that experiencing nature has a positive effect on our physical and mental wellbeing. Other studies also show that people with pets tend to be happier.
Nature and images of nature often inspire feelings of awe. Piff et. al.’s study found that this sense of awe changes our sense of self and reduces barriers we feel between ourselves and others. The positive emotions we get from nature have also been shown to foster altruistic behavior even when briefly experienced. On the other side, Louv’s “Last Child in the Woods” study hypothesizes that depression and anxiety are fuelled by a disconnect with nature they term a “nature-deficit disorder”.
Other studies have shown the numerous and wide-ranging benefits of a connection to nature. For example:

What are the benefits of tree-hugging?

As we have outlined, getting out into nature, being surrounded by it, or simply viewing it can have psychological and physical benefits. Getting up close and personal only serves to accentuate these effects. This has long been known in Japan, where the national health program has offered forest bathing since 1982.
Known as shinrin-yokuforest bathing has been found to reduce blood pressure, improve memory and concentration, and lower cortisol levels. Rather than simply strolling through a forest, it involves shedding all devices and mindfully spending time under the tree’s canopies. Typically, this would last at least 3 hours. However, the close contact of hugging a tree for 5 minutes makes mindful practice somewhat easier.
Breathe in the smells, feel the way the tree presses against you, feel its energy, and listen to the sounds. Some studies have suggested that forest bathing and tree-hugging might even work because of chemicals the tree emits. Known as phytoncides, these chemicals may have physiological effects that explain why hugging trees and immersing yourself in nature can be beneficial for your health.

How can you benefit from hugging trees and immersing in nature?

walking in nature
There are numerous ways you can seek to benefit from increased engagement with nature, whether that involves hugging trees or not. Here, we outline some of the different ways you can increase your connectedness to nature from the small to the big:
  1. Watch nature programs (truly, this works!).
  2. Surround yourself with plants (at work and at home).
  3. Choose routes with more trees and green spaces, not just the quickest.
  4. Get up early for the birds’ dawn chorus (be sure to be in place before the start of sunrise).
  5. Grow your own flowers and/or food to feel that connectedness with nature.
  6. Plant a tree (or more than one).
  7. Sit under a tree and practice mindfulness.
  8. Go the whole hog and give that tree a big old cuddle! Do this daily, once or more. Close your eyes and really feel at one with nature.
During the time of social distancing, we should be careful to avoid emotional distancing. Fortunately, Iceland’s forestry service might just have cracked how we can all feel more connected.
More and more studies reveal the benefits of feeling connected with nature, and tree-hugging is just one example. Simply seeing it more can improve our wellbeing, both physically and psychologically. However, when we get up close and hug a tree, the benefits can be even greater. Give it a go and see what it can do!


 

 

Lottie Miles

 




 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2020 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 
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No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 


 

 

Like this! please bookmark. It is updated daily

 


 
 
 
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publicado por achama às 22:46
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Terça-feira, 21 de Abril de 2020

7 Famous INTPs in Literature, Science and History

7 Famous INTPs in Literature, Science and History

Lottie Miles, M.A.

learning-mind.com

Posted April 20th, 2020.

 
famous intps.

 


If you’ve taken the Myers-Briggs Personality Type test, you may have found that you fit into the ‘INTP’ category. This stands for introverted, intuitive, thinking, and perceiving. But what does it mean to have this personality type? And who can you relate to in popular culture? Let’s take a look at famous INTPs in more detail. We will try and uncover who from literature, science, and history fits into this pretty rare category.

What Is the INTP Personality Type?

People with the INTP personality type have their primary focus on the internal world rather than external. They are analytical and excellent problem solvers. Theory is the best friend of those with an INTP personality type. Moreover, they will constantly be striving for a theoretical explanation for what they witness in the external world.
INTPs, generally, have an above-average level of intelligence. Regarding social circles, as introverts, INTPs prefer a few select close friends rather than large friendship groups. However, their introversion does not make INTPs unapproachable. They are known for their loyalty, affection, and interest in people.
Today, we will talk about famous people with INTP personality traits who have made significant accomplishments in the fields of literature and science.

7 Famous INTPs in Literature, Science, and History

  1. Albert Einstein

Albert Einstein was a theoretical physicist who pioneered the theory of relativity. He has retrospectively been assigned the INTP personality type and is probably the most famous and typical INTP. Whilst, Einstein did not take the Myers-Briggs test, his quirks suggest he should reside in this camp.
infamous introverts
A reserved person, he was also known for being incredibly approachable and humble. Renowned for his acute intellect and ability to think outside the box. His INTP personality meant he went down in history as one of the greatest scientists of all time.
  1. Hermione Granger

Hermione Granger, the well-loved Harry Potter heroine, is a classic INTP personality type. She is fiercely intelligent and has an insatiable thirst for knowledge. She has the ability to get herself and her friends Ron and Harry out of many a sticky situation. This highlights her excellent intuition and ability to think logically as well as creatively.
She also cares greatly for her friends and is unwaveringly loyal. Do you find yourself relating to Hermione? If you are unsure of your personality type, you may just be an INTP also.
  1. Marie Curie

Marie Curie famous intp
The first woman to win the Nobel Prize, Marie Curie was a physicist and chemist. She is well-known for her discovery of radium in 1898. An intellectual, Curie dedicated her life to scientific research and her work paved the way for many developments in cancer research.
Despite her fame and acute intellect, Marie Curie was modest and lived a largely private life. As an introverted problem solver, Marie Curie is one of the famous people with the INTP personality type.
  1. Abraham Lincoln

abraham lincoln famous intp personality
The 16th president of the United States, Abraham Lincoln, served throughout the American Civil War. Lincoln is said to have taken an objective approach to decision making. Indeed, he favored seeing the bigger picture over deliberating over the minor details. He relied heavily on logic to deal with the difficult situations that crossed his path throughout his presidency.
Lincoln was also known for being a great debater and was a prominent contributor in The Great Debates of 1858. A true INTP if ever there was one.
  1. Franz Kafka

franz kafka
The German-speaking novelist Franz Kafka is famous for his surrealist works of fiction. These include fantastic pieces like The Metamorphosis and The Trial. An introvert by nature, Kafka was also known as a loyal friend to those fortunate enough to make it into his social circle.
Furthermore, his obvious intelligence and deep-thinking nature are prominent throughout his books. Kafka had an unconventional approach to writing and a tendency to carve his own unique path. These are true traits of someone with an INTP personality type.
  1. Jane Austen

Jane Austen intp
Jane Austen was an English novelist who is well known for her fine-tuned social observations. She is also known for her accurate insight into the lives of women living in the 19th century. Her approach to writing was not typical of its time.
Indeed, her honest observations showed her ability to think outside the box. Moreover, the humor and irony that are present in her novels are demonstrative of her sharp mind, intuition, and skills of perception. If Austen was to take the Myers-Briggs personality test today, it’s likely she’d classify as an INTP personality type.
  1. Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin famous intps
People with an INTP personality try to explain the world around them. It is their logic that helps them understand what they witness in everyday life. It may come as no surprise, therefore, to see that Charles Darwin falls into the INTP category.
The author of The Theory of Evolution, Darwin sought the order in his world and spent his life attempting to explain it. He even drew up a list of the pros and cons of marrying before he chose to pursue a wife!

INTPs Are Powerful

As you can see, being introverted, intuitive, thinking, and perceiving can certainly pave the way to success. Moreover, the INTP personality type resonates in key figures throughout history. These people have broken the mold and used their intellect and skills of perception to make a mark in the world.
Indeed, famous INTPs tend to be pioneers in their field, decision-makers, and creators of great works of literature. If you have an INTP personality type, you could just be about to make history.
References:
  1. https://www.cpp.edu
  2. https://www.loc.gov
  3. https://www.nps.gov


 

 

Lottie Miles

 




 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2020 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 
Archives:

 

 
and https://www.facebook.com/mel.tavares.75


A Trusty with Privacy Search 
Alternative to Google
startpage.com

Alternatives to YouTube
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brighteon.com
 
 



No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 


 

 

Like this! please bookmark. It is updated daily

 


 
 
 
Free counters!

  geoglobe1
 
 
publicado por achama às 00:24
link | comentar | favorito
Domingo, 19 de Abril de 2020

What Is the Story of Your Life? How You Tell It May Reveal Who You Are.

What Is the Story of Your Life? 

How You Tell It May Reveal Who You Are.

Lottie Miles, M.A.

learning-mind.com

Posted April 18th, 2020.

 
story of your life narrative psychology.

 


You might not often get a chance to tell the story of your life, but when you do how would you tell itRecent research has shown that the way you tell the story of your life has an impact on your personality and your well-being.
In this post, we take a look at how our personal narratives dictate who we are and we look at ways we can alter how we interpret our life for the better.
What Is Narrative Psychology?
Personal narratives fall within the realm of narrative psychology. Narrative psychology is concerned with how humans create meaning from stories and how they portray themselves in the story of their life. Narrative psychologists are interested in how we choose to tell our personal narratives, how this changes over time, and what this reveals about our personality.

Why Is the Story of Your Life Important?

The story of your life isn’t only present when you tell it to others, it is also a personal narrative that exists within us whether we recognize it or not.
When we think about our past we are, in fact, telling ourselves the story of our life. How we interpret that story is, according to researchers at Western Washington University, reveals, constructs and sustains ourselves through time. And it is how we make sense of the world around us.
The story of your life is important because it is a product of events, interpretations, and facts that you have picked out from your years on this earth and pieced together to make meaning. What we choose to focus on, and how we tell it can reflect who we are.

How Can the Story of Your Life Impact Who You Are?

So, what does it mean that the story of our life reflects who we are? Let’s look at an example of a memory. Imagine that you had gone through a difficult time in your career. You were made redundant and left without a job. During this time you discovered that your real interests lay elsewhere and you found yourself pursuing a different and more fulfilling career path.
How would you tell this story? Would you focus on the negative part or would you interpret this time in your life as a positive turning point in your life?
Those who tell their life stories with more of a positive slant, that see light in the dark moments, are more likely to experience greater life satisfaction and better mental health. This is also true for those who give a sense of autonomy in their life story and mention meaningful relationships within their personal narrative.
On the other hand, reliving your experiences and telling stories containing more “contamination”, negativity and a lack of autonomy can relate to less life satisfaction and reduced well-being. This can also have an impact on the kind of person we continue to be and how we continue to view the world around us.

Adjusting Our Personal Narratives

In telling our own story we reveal how we see ourselves. It uncovers how we have interpreted events in our lives and whether or not we view them from a positive or a negative angle. Unsurprisingly, this has an impact on our well-being, life satisfaction, and our self-esteem. How many times have you compared your life with someone else and being left feeling inferior?
Such a thought pattern is unhelpful, and in re-framing our personal narrative we may be able to improve our outlook on life. One study of life stories asked volunteers to write their narrative in a more constructive way – following this these individuals showed greater goal persistence long after the experiment took place. This suggests that, in re-framing our personal narrative, we can improve our motivation and general satisfaction from day to day life.
Known as ‘narrative therapy’, individuals can be helped to re-interpret the story of their life and be assisted in seeing it in a more constructive and positive way.
In this respect, re-framing the story of your life is not dissimilar to the philosophical concept that life is what we make of it and that we construct our own realities. It is not surprising, therefore, that how we construct our own life affects who we are and how we view ourselves.
Take some time to think about the story of your life and how you have previously framed it for yourself and others.
See how any of the negative aspects could be re-framed into something that you learned from, whether it led you to meet a life-long friend or generally viewing it in a more constructive light.
Life certainly has its ups and downs and not all of it can be positive. But realizing when events are actually bad, or if you have just interpreted them in that way, will help you to learn about yourself, who you are and how you might be able to alter such perspectives for improved life satisfaction and well-being.


 

 

Lottie Miles

 




 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2020 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



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No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 


 

 

Like this! please bookmark. It is updated daily

 


 
 
 
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publicado por achama às 01:18
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Quinta-feira, 9 de Abril de 2020

How to Cultivate Empathy and Compassion in the Coronavirus Crisis

How to Cultivate Empathy and Compassion in the Coronavirus Crisis

Lottie Miles, M.A.

learning-mind.com

Posted April 8th, 2020.

 
Empathy and Compassion coronavirus.

 


During these uncertain times, more and more of us around the world face curfews and social distancing. However, we know that too much inward focus can lead to us feeling isolated. On the other hand, studies show numerous benefits from giving social support and practicing empathy and compassion for others.
Indeed, compassion for others can reduce loneliness and stress and increase feelings of happiness and connectedness. So how can we cultivate empathy and compassion during the time of the coronavirus?
In this post, we outline 5 ways to cultivate these feelings after first looking at why empathy and compassion might be so good for us.

Why Is Compassion and Empathy for Others Beneficial?

During times of need, humans naturally seek to care for and protect others. This happens for biological and neurological reasons.
Inagaki argues that the same neural regions drawn on in maternal caregiving and providing social support to others are also used by the brain to process rewards. Moreover, they inhibit connections in the brain that trigger stress and a sense of threat. This highlights why looking after others can be so good for our mental health.
Caring for others is not just morally right but actually plays a role in the survival of the human species. For example, when caring for a baby who requires intense support at the start of life.
Similarly, the anthropologist Margaret Mead notes that the first sign of civilization in ancient cultures is demonstrated by bones that have healed. If animals break a bone, they will die before it heals. A broken bone that is healed indicates the time has been taken by someone other than the human themselves to care and nurture them back to good health.
Together, these factors might explain why Brown’s study found that providing care for others is actually more beneficial than receiving it. Their study showed that mortality was significantly reduced for those who provided instrumental support to their loved ones.
Receiving support had no effect on mortality. These examples then, serve to highlight that compassion and empathy for others is not just morally right. In fact, they show that compassion is both an evolutionary mechanism of survival and a fundamental aspect of humanity.

Cultivating Empathy and Compassion during the Coronavirus Crisis

So how can you tuck into a healthy dose of compassion and empathy? Here, we outline 5 simple ways you can stay connected with others, build community spirit, and look after one another whilst socially distancing:
1. Follow guidelines & stay home
As the article ‘Half of Uruguay’s coronavirus cases traced to a single guest at a society party’ shows, not staying home can be the least compassionate thing you could do. Therefore, staying home is one of the main ways you can show compassion for everyone during the coronavirus crisis.
One of the most effective methods of helping stop the spread of coronavirus is social distancing. Staying at home more will help you prevent hospitals from being overrun and reduce deaths. People all over the world are practicing similar measures.
So staying at home can actually be a way to feel connected with the global community too. However, it is important to remember how to avoid emotional distancing during social distancing.

2. Community organizing – at a distance

There are so many ways to virtually communicate. WhatsApp, Skype, Zoom, and other communications platforms mean we can look after people in our community in different ways. We can also do this whilst avoiding sharing the same physical space. However, if we are going to effectively care for vulnerable people in our community, it is vital to organize our efforts collectively.
Fortunately, joining a mutual-aid network can help you feel close to the community around you. Together, you will be able to more safely support the vulnerable in your community.

3. Offer to bring groceries to those socially isolating

Whilst you could do this independently of point 2, it will be better if you do them both together. Since the goal of social distancing is minimizing social contact, everyone is required to cut down shop visits.
By coordinating for multiple people at once, we can support more people in one go to get their essentials. This can keep total shop visits down to a minimum in our community whilst helping us cultivate compassion.
4. Be kind to people in vulnerable jobs
When you do have to visit the shop, be kind and grateful to those people having to work to keep things going. If there are no toilet rolls on the shelves or no canned tomatoes to pick up, this is an issue with our supply chains. This may be the fault of the business or the government but not of those on low pay serving you.
It’s unlikely to be ‘panic buyers’ either. People may have full trolleys because they are supporting their neighbors. Alternatively, they might need to cover themselves for up to 2 weeks isolating – that demands larger baskets than normal.
If you get the last bag of flour, why not try giving it away to the person who arrives to see a bare shelf instead? That act of empathy will feed you longer than that flour ever could.

5. Support laid-off workers

Supporting the unemployed could be pointing laid-off workers in the direction of support groups. It could be helping build pressure on governments to support them with reasonable sick pay or a universal basic income.
You could continue paying for services you can’t receive if you can afford it until pressure on the government has been effective. You could make up food parcels and care packages for laid-off workers and their families. Or you can support workers taking collective action. Whether that’s to stop the spread of coronavirus due to unsafe working practices or being forced to work.

Final Words

These are just 5 ways to cultivate empathy and compassion as we face the coronavirus crisis. However, you can practice it in any way you can, big or small. We can also develop empathy in unconventional ways. As the exploration of why it is beneficial shows, practicing compassion can help everyone get through these challenging times. By cultivating empathy, we can all be better off.


 

 

Lottie Miles

 




 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2020 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 
Archives:

 

 
and https://www.facebook.com/mel.tavares.75


A Trusty with Privacy Search 
Alternative to Google
startpage.com

Alternatives to YouTube
bitchute.com
brighteon.com
 
 



No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 


 

 

Like this! please bookmark. It is updated daily

 


 
 
 
Free counters!

  geoglobe1
 
 
publicado por achama às 01:47
link | comentar | favorito
Quinta-feira, 2 de Abril de 2020

7 Great Online Events Every Culture Lover Can Attend from Home

7 Great Online Events Every Culture Lover Can Attend from Home

Lottie Miles, M.A.

learning-mind.com

Posted April 2nd, 2020.

 
online events culture.

 


In this post, we will look at 7 great online events every culture lover can attend from their home. With these online events, we can all expand our minds at home, no matter what’s keeping us there.
The coronavirus has ravaged many of our spaces of cultural exploration like nothing we’ve ever seen before. Fortunately, even as the last galleries, music venues, and cinemas close their doors, there has been an explosion of culture that everyone can enjoy from the comfort of their own homes.
Some of this has been inspired by books we’d long left sitting on the shelf. Even better, our classic cultural venues are finding innovative ways to bring art to us in new ways.

7 Great Online Events When Stuck At Home

Music

1. Online Events for Opera Aficionados

The stunning Metropolitan Opera house in New York is opening its doors to their Live in HD series. Each week, they will be offering up operas from encores past. Starting with Wagner week, including the inspirational Der Ring Des Nibelungen tetralogy and culminating with ‘Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg’. Each day delivers a new delight.
Other venues, such as the Royal Opera House in London, are also streaming past shows live over the internet. With all this provided for free, opera has never been more accessible from your sofa.

2. Live-Streamed Gigs & Concerts

Venues and bars were some of the earliest places to have their doors slammed shut. Fortunately, musicians across the globe used to packing out stadiums have taken to live-streaming from their living rooms to keep us from missing out.
Neil Young has promised a sing-along by the campfire. Check out the World Health Organization (WHO)’s ‘#Together, At Home: Global Citizen Solidarity Sessions’ concert series for global acts.
Billboard & Vulture have also put together a packed line-up of everything going on in the music world. Go clubbing with friends over Skype, Zoom, or other social distance friendly communications channels with these gigs.

Art

3. Google’s Take a Look Inside

With over 3,000 museum tours available virtually, Google allows you to visit cultural sights online.
Stroll from the spiraling ramp of New York’s Guggenheim the Great Court in the British Museum in London in minutes. Or marvel at Van Gogh in Paris’s Musée d’Orsay over breakfast, before feasting on the Acropolis Museum’s artifacts for lunch. Keep as cultured as kombucha from the comfort of your own home with these fabulous ways to enjoy art.

4. Online Museums

Museums are also opening the proverbial online doors to their artwork and other collections.
Check out the ‘Museé du Louvre’s Ancient Egyptian treasures’ in Paris if you love the ancient wonders. Rembrandt’s stunning collection of portraiture in Amsterdam (1590-1670) is also now available for your casual perusal. The Rivoli’s latest exhibitions have also been released in the Digital Cosmos.
Whilst nothing can beat seeing the same paint struck on the canvas by art’s greats in the flesh, gaining an understanding of their works is actually easier online.

Theatre & Comedy

5. Online Comedy Events

If sitting in a comedy club fills you with dread, why not enjoy the array of comedy online events?
Mark Thomas’s comedy with a social purpose Check Up: Our NHS at 70 is ideal for the times. The proceeds raised from this goes to supporting food banks in the UK.
Or why not check out the innovative improv show ‘Haggis!’ designed live by Facebook and Twitter users in March 2020. Or check out New York comedy club Caveat who are streaming their shows on their YouTube channelScreaming with laughter is also offering 2 online shows every month whilst they are closed down.

6. Online Theatre Events

Theatre is alive with free streaming services springing up across the globe for some of the world’s biggest theatres. The National Theatre in London will soon be streaming their shows on YouTube. Whether Twelfth Night, Jane Eyre, or One Man, Two Guvnors is your thing, there is plenty to be happy about with their online events.
The Coronavirus Theatre Club has also released lots of interesting shorts and monologues with impressive results. The Stage has also compiled a more comprehensive list of online theatre events culture lovers can enjoy from their sofa.

Film

7. New ways to watch films

During the peak of the Coronavirus crisis in China, an online platform saw half a billion people watch a major movie release. People are also finding new ways to engage with each other from their homes.
If you can’t meet at the cinema, what’s the harm of sticking on a video call and watching films together online. You can also use apps like TwoSeven on Firefox or Google Chrome browsers for a more in tune experience. Doing things together can help us avoid emotional distancing in times of social distancing.

Have fun at home with these cultural events online

During these times more of us are having to spend long periods of time indoors. To help get us through this, we need to think of more fun things to do at home. Fortunately, thanks to the innovative responses of our cultural sphere everyone can find online events to suit their tastes.

Or why not break away from the norm and try something new? With so much on offer for free, now is as good a time as any to explore your cultural side. As much as venues seem like such an integral component of the arts, culture is always what we make of it.


 

 

Lottie Miles

 




 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2019 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 
Archives:

 

 
and https://www.facebook.com/mel.tavares.75


A Trusty with Privacy Search 
Alternative to Google
startpage.com

Alternatives to YouTube
bitchute.com
brighteon.com
 
 



No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 


 

 

Like this! please bookmark. It is updated daily

 


 
 
 
Free counters!

  geoglobe1
 
 
publicado por achama às 23:56
link | comentar | favorito
Terça-feira, 21 de Janeiro de 2020

5 Benefits of Handwriting Compared to Typing, According to Science

Lottie Miles.

learning-mind.com

Posted January 21st, 2020.

 
Benefits of Handwriting.

 

 
 
In the modern world, the prominence of smartphones, tablets, and computers means that we communicate via typing rather than the written word. The art of writing by hand is fast becoming a tradition of the past. Yet, according to science, handwriting benefits our brain in multiple ways.
 
In this post, we explore the 5 benefits of handwriting compared to typing and show why you should consider putting pen to paper more often.
 
Is handwriting a lost art?
 
Can you remember the last time you put pen to paper? If the answer is no, then you are likely to be part of a growing body of people who now solely use typing rather than the handwritten word.
 
While it’s hard to put an exact figure on the decline in handwriting over time, some are predicting that this is a dying art form. A study conducted by Docmail found that out of 2000 respondents, one in three had not written anything down on paper over a six month period.
 
5 Benefits of Handwriting
 
So why are we being encouraged to grab a pen and practice the old fashioned art of handwriting? Let’s take a look at the ways handwriting can benefit your cognitive abilities.
 
1. Writing by hand helps us to learn
 
When writing by hand or typing into a computer, we use different parts of our brain, which affects our ability to learn. The movements which we make when we write triggers the activation of larger regions of the brain than when we type, including those that take care of language, healing, thinking, and our memory.
 
A study by Longcamp et al (2006) compared the effect handwriting and typing have on our ability to learn. They found that children that learned to write letters by hand were better able to remember the letters and recognize them than children who had learned the letters by typing them onto a computer.
 
Further research has also demonstrated how handwriting benefits our ability to learn in comparison with typing. Mueller and Oppenheimer (2014) compared the ability of students to comprehend information conveyed to them whilst attending a lecture by comparing those that took notes on laptops versus those that wrote them out by hand.
 
Over the course of three experiments, they repeatedly found that students that took notes in longhand were better at answering questions about the lecture than those that typed up the notes.
 
The study concluded that in typing out notes, we are more likely to be transcribing them verbatim. At the same time, with handwriting them out, we are required to process the information and reframe it in our own words, which aids the learning process.
 
2. Handwriting sparks creativity
 
One of the appealing benefits of handwriting is that it helps to spark creativity. Many famous writers have favored the written word even when they had access to a typewriter or computer. J.K Rowling, for instance, hand wrote the whole of The Tales of Beedle the Bard in a leather-bound notebook. Franz Kafka and Ernest Hemingway were also said to have preferred putting pen to paper over reaching for the typewriter.
 
According to science, there is a link between fluid arm movement and its ability to enhance creativity. The speed with which we write also helps us to be more creative. For most of us, typing is now second nature and, consequently, we type with speed. Writing, on the other hand, is much slower and allows you the time to process your thoughts as you write. This gives creative ideas the chance to develop as you write.
 
3. Putting pen to paper can sharpen your brain
 
Retaining cognitive ability as you grow older can also be aided through writing by hand. As when we write, we are engaging our brain more than when we type, handwriting practice boosts your cognitive performance. This, in turn, can reduce the occurrence of cognitive decline in later life. Writing letters, keeping a handwritten diary, or writing out plans can all help towards keeping your brain sharp as you grow older.
 
4. Handwriting can improve your problem-solving skills
 
The process of writing can also help with problem-solving. Many find that writing out the problem can help to clear the mind of the confusion around an issue and make it easier to reach a solution.
 
The technique of ‘brain dumping’ is a great way of being able to see all your ideas down on paper and conceptualize what the next steps are. It can help us to organize knowledge, spot patterns, and draw connections as we write it down.
 
5. Writing helps to relax our mind
 
In a fast-paced world, finding the time to sit down and write can be troublesome. However, in focusing the mind in this way, we can use writing as a way to be mindful and relax our mind. It forces us to slow down a little and patiently write out what we want to say. Similar to doodling or painting, writing can be a way to find a moment of peace in a chaotic world.
 
Final Words
 
With online diary planners, messaging apps, and email, it can seem like there is no longer a need for a pen and paper. However, there are multiple benefits of handwriting which suggest we should not be so quick to dismiss them.
 
Writing on paper can help to engage our brain in a way that typing cannot. It can help us to learn and retain information better, unleash our creative juices, help us to problem solve and even be a mindful process of relaxation.


 

 

Lottie Miles

 






 
About the Author: Lottie Miles


 
Lottie Miles is a professional researcher and writer with a passion for human rights. She has 4 years of experience working within the NGO sector and has a Masters Degree in Social Policy. She has a keen interest in exploring ways in which happiness habits can help to improve mental health and wellbeing. In her spare time, she likes doing crossword puzzles, painting and traveling.
 
Copyright © 2012-2019 Learning Mind. All rights reserved. For permission to reprint, contact us.
 



Compiled by http://violetflame.biz.ly from: 
 
Archives:

 

 
and https://www.facebook.com/mel.tavares.75


A Trusty with Privacy Search 
Alternative to Google
startpage.com

Alternative to YouTube
brighteon.com
 
 



No religious or political creed is advocated here.

Organised religion is unnecessary to spirituality.

Excellent teachings of the masters have been contaminated by the dogmatic control of these religions.

Discernment yes; judgement does not.
If you use discernment you are free to research with an open mind. 

With discernment it is possible to reach the spirit of the letter of any writing and it is also much easier to listen to the voice of the soul that comes from the heart.
Individually you can be helped to find your Truth that is different of everyone. 


Please respect all credits.

 
Discernment is recommended.
 

All articles are of the respective authors and/or publishers responsibility. 


 

 

Like this! please bookmark. It is updated daily

 


 
 
 
Free counters!

  geoglobe1
 
 
publicado por achama às 03:31
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